Blackberry Modified To ‘Help Drug Cartels’

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The chief executive of a business that generated highly-secure smartphones allegedly employed by a number of the world’s most notorious criminals was indicted.

Canadian-based Phantom Secure created “thousands of dollars” promoting the altered Blackberry devices to be used by the likes of the Sinaloa Cartel, researchers said.

The fees marked the first time US police have targeted a business for knowingly producing encrypted technologies for offenders.

The Department of Justice detained Vincent Ramos at Seattle a week. He had been indicted on Thursday and four partners.

They’re charged with racketeering and conspiracy to help the supply of medication. Both offenses have a maximum punishment of life in prison. Mr Ramos is the just one of the team now in custody.

“All these traffickers, for example members of the Sinaloa Cartel, would utilize these fully-encrypted apparatus to ease their drug trafficking activities so as to prevent law enforcement scrutiny.”

Blackberry didn’t respond to requests for comment on Thursday – and researchers wouldn’t say if the company had worked together on this circumstance. Mr Braverman stated Blackberry wasn’t alone in using its own handsets changed for prohibited purposes.

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“Our understanding is that there are a number of different businesses which exist such as this. Even the FBI, and our workplace, will keep on exploring not just Phantom Secure but another firm that offers this type of communication device to companies that are criminal.”

He added that although virtually every smartphone on the market provides hard-to-crack encryption – and programs out of Facebook, Google and Apple – Phantom Secure ought to be held culpable for the consumers of its providers were performing.

“The distinction is that this business was specifically-designed to help international drug trafficking organisations,” he explained.

“The only way you are in a position to really use those devices and get one of those devices is if someone else cares for you personally.”

Phantom Secure sold apparatus on a subscription basis at a price of $2,000-$3,000 for about six months of usage.

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To be able to be a client, an present user needs to vouch for the brand new individual.

Communications throughout the telephones are sent to servers in Panama and Hong Kong, based on court records, which makes information more challenging to trace.

Phantom Secure can also remove key performance from the apparatus to lock down them, like voice communication, microphone, GPS, camera, web and messaging programs, leaving only the text performance.

Law enforcement authorities have been frustrated by collateral technologies making it more difficult to get communications involving suspects.

Privacy and receptive rights activists assert that eliminating or only weakening encryption could put everyone in danger of information surveillance and theft – not only offenders.